The trend towards greater automation and data sharing among product development and manufacturing technologies—often referred to as the Smart Factory or Industry 4.0—is having a dramatic impact on the types of tools designers need to develop products. Manufacturers have embraced automation because it provides many competitive advantages, and product developers increasingly face design, workflow, and data requirements that extend beyond the capabilities of traditional, single-point 3D modeling and 2D drawing solutions. Meeting these emerging automation and data-sharing demands requires designers to utilize an integrated 3D product development system like the SOLIDWORKS® design-to-manufacturing environment. With integrated SOLIDWORKS solutions, product development and manufacturing organizations can help lead this automation transformation.

Currently, We are iIn the Smart Factory or Industry 4.0, CAD systems are no longer single-point design solutions that merely generate drawings for production, with different engineering disciplines using separate design packages to create their distinct portions of a product design. In today’s emerging smart factories, product developers need an integrated CAD system that not only produces multidisciplinary CAD data but also concurrently leverages 3D CAD data for all other functions, including production.

BEYOND CAD MODELING: PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT NOW UNIFYING DESIGN, ENGINEERING, AND MANUFACTURING

For the past few decades, designers, engineers, and others involved in the development of products often viewed computer-aided design (CAD) systems as geometry and/or drawing generators. Production personnel needed 2D engineering drawings to manufacture parts and assemble products, so single-point CAD solutions—first in 2D and more recently in 3D—were all that product designers needed to create the models, output the drawing prints, and build the bills of materials (BOMs) required for production. If the product design geometry was needed to support another function, that data would be translated, converted, or rebuilt to meet that purpose. While this product development perspective and approach sufficed for much of the now-waning Third Industrial Revolution—the Digital Age—it will prove to be woefully insufficient for meeting the product development needs of the emerging Fourth Industrial Revolution—the Internet of Things and Artificial Intelligence—which demands higher levels of interconnectivity, data sharing, and automation.In the Smart Factory or Industry 4.0, CAD systems are no longer single-point design solutions that merely generate drawings for production, with different engineering disciplines using separate design packages to create their distinct portions of a product design. In today’s emerging smart factories, product developers need an integrated CAD system that not only produces multidisciplinary CAD data but also concurrently leverages 3D CAD data for all other functions, including production. By making 3D CAD data the foundational DNA of the entire enterprise, manufacturing organizations can capitalize on the growing opportunities for improved efficiency, greater collaboration, and increased innovation inherent to an integrated product development system.This integration goes beyond combining different engineering disciplines (e.g., industrial, mechanical, surfacing, electrical, and electronic design) into a single compatible design system and extends to a host of downstream functions, such as visualization, validation, cost estimating, manufacturing planning, data management, manufacturing, quality control, documentation, packaging development, and marketing. Moreover, integration doesn’t mean just the ability to work with the CAD data via import/export/conversion protocols; it means having access to and working with the same CAD data concurrently—with updates due to changes made automatically and propagated to all other functions—within a single native environment, rather than through a longer, more costly, sequential process

THE FIVE REASONS TO UPGRADE TO AN INTEGRATED 3D PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT SOLUTION LIKE SOLIDWORKS

There are many reasons why manufacturers should move to an integrated 3D product development environment like SOLIDWORKS, ranging from ease-of-use to an extensive set of related, integrated solutions. Most of these reasons fall within five primary categories of benefits that align with the product development and manufacturing goals of leading companies. The top five reasons to make the switch to SOLIDWORKS :

1. Boost Productivity

2. Reduce Costs

3. Improve Quality

4. Foster Collaboration

5. Increase Innovation